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The StickerTalk Presents: How to Keep a Resolution

The StickerTalk Presents: How to Keep a Resolution


According to an article published by Huffington Post, only about eight percent of New Year’s resolutions succeed. This statistic may seem daunting; however The StickerTalk has concocted a compilation of hints that we hope will help you avoid this commonly observed dissolve of resolve.

Write your resolution down.

Putting a goal in writing will not only make your resolution more tangible, but this strategy also helps you remember your commitment. We recommend placing your written reminder near a location such as your nightstand or mirror where it can frequently refresh your memory.

Keep a diary, journal, or log.

Maintaining a record of your efforts (or lack thereof) helps you identify your strengths and weaknesses. Journals, diaries, and logs may additionally serve as a source of encouragement and motivation.

Foster a positive attitude.

Winston Churchill once stated, “Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.” Regardless of the specifics of your resolution, an optimistic outlook is a universal key to achieving any goal. Whether you have decided to write a novel or drop a few pounds, a negative attitude can halt even the most determined improvement efforts.

Happy New Year

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StickerTalk Explores New Year Around the Globe

StickerTalk Explores New Year Around the Globe


A couple of weeks ago, The StickerTalk delved into the riveting subject of Christmas celebrations across the earth. To continue in the spirit of the season, we hope to enlighten our readers with copious curiosities about exotic New Year celebrations.

North Carolina

While North Carolina isn’t exactly a foreign country, the people of Brasstown, North Carolina, harbor an especially eccentric New Year’s custom. The hallmark of a Brasstown New Year’s bash is their annual “Possum-Drop,” an appropriate celebration for a city that considers themselves “The Possum Capital of the World.” The town originally placed a live opossum in a clear box to be lowered at the stroke of midnight; however, a fake possum has been used in more recent years in order to satisfy cries for the humane and ethical treatment of animals.

Die Cut North Carolina sticker

Scotland

The term “New Year” is not in a typical Scot’s vocabulary. Instead, revelers in Scotland refer to the celebration as “Hogmanay.” The Scottish nation participates in a variety of holiday hullabaloos, but fire festivals prove to be a favorite Hogmanay tradition. Brave merrymakers light titanic bonfires and promenade throughout their communities while flourishing fiery flames. Some historians date this custom back to the era of the Vikings, citing purification as the purpose of the fire festivals.

Round Scotland Flag Sticker

Brazil

A nation best known for its tropical scenery, it comes as no surprise that the ocean plays an integral role in Brazilian New Year’s traditions. Some worshippers offer New Year’s sacrifices to Iemanja, the goddess of the sea in Brazilian mythology, by tossing flowers into the ocean. If your flowers are swept out to sea, according to Brazilian mythology, your offering has been accepted; however, if your they return to the beach, Iemanja rejected your offering.

Circle Brazil Flag Sticker


The information used in this article was found in the following webpages. Click on these hyperlinks to learn more about New Year’s traditions around the world.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/galleries/Strange-New-Year-traditions-around-the-world/nyc-fire/

http://www.newyears-brazil.com/new-years-eve-traditions.asp

https://www.tripsavvy.com/hogmanay-traditions-in-scotland-1661711

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The Lovable Labrador

The Lovable Labrador


Regardless of size, shape, or color, every breed of dog offers a unique set of qualities to potential owners; however, the Labrador Retriever has constantly proven to be America’s favorite canine breed throughout recent years. To anyone who has had the privilege of interacting with a Lab, the breed’s universal favor is no cause for surprise. A breed that originates from Newfoundland, the Labrador Retriever is often considered the friendliest of all dogs. While most Labs mainly serve as companions, their strong desire to please allows this dog to effectively tackle an assorted array of tasks. The American Kennel Club classifies the Labrador Retriever as a sporting breed due to the Lab’s working heritage. Early Labs aided fishermen in corralling fish attempting escape from hooks. Today, Labrador Retrievers happily play the role of water dog, effortlessly paddling into chilly waters to retrieve downed fowl during duck hunts. Versatility combines with enthusiastic personality to make the Labrador Retriever the best friend of countless generations of dog owners.

Heart I Love Labs bumper sticker


The information used in this blog was found at http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/labrador-retriever#/slide/1. Click on this hyperlink to learn more about the Labrador Retriever.

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A Closer Look at a Texan Treasure

A Closer Look at a Texan Treasure


An island characterized by natural beauty and unique culture, Galveston, Texas, continues to attract countless curious adventurers to its picturesque shores. While this coastal city is mainly recognized for its plethora of tourist attractions, Galveston’s somewhat obscure history teems with intriguing accounts of bravery, loss, and heroism. In this edition of The StickerTalk, we would like to share a compilation of interesting facts and offer our readers fresh perspective regarding historic Galveston Island.

 

The island’s first inhabitants were the Karankawa Indians.

This tribe sustained themselves by fishing and hunting in the island’s shores and marshes. Galveston’s abundant natural resources allowed the Karankawas to thrive until the arrival of European explorers and settlers.

 

Galveston was instrumental in the Texas Revolution.

An ideal port city, Galveston’s harbor was home to the Texas Navy. The city also provided refuge to the fledgling Texan government; Galveston was considered the government’s “last point of retreat.”

 

The island played a pivotal role during the American Civil War.

The Union forces, attempting to weaken the rebellious Southern states, blockaded Galveston’s industrious port. Northern troops even occupied the island for a short period of time. However, the federal presence was forced from the city following the Battle of Galveston in 1863. The city served as a base for blockade runners throughout the conflict.

 

Galveston was nearly destroyed by the worst natural disaster in American history.

Leading up to the beginning of the twentieth century, Galveston Island earned the title of the wealthiest city in the sprawling state of Texas. It was the first Texan city to experience electric lights, the telephone, and baseball games. However, the island’s good fortune quickly faded on September 8, 1900. An unforeseen, yet massive, hurricane slammed into the barrier island, laying waste to large portions of the city and claiming the lives of at least 6,000 souls. The devastation was so horrific, it even arrested the attention of a past The StickerTalk subject, Clara Barton. Seventy-eight years old at the time of the hurricane, the then-president of the American Red Cross journeyed to an unrecognizable Galveston to personally lead recovery efforts.

 

You can still experience Galveston’s riveting past when you visit the island today.

The city contains multitudes of preserved historical treasures. From elegant Victorian houses to the brick streets of the Strand, Galveston’s incomparable story continues to be told by remnants of the island’s illustrious past.

Galveston Texas Flag decal


The information used in this blog was found at https://www.1900storm.com/redcross/ and https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hdg01. Click on these hyperlinks to delve even deeper into Galveston’s history.

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Lofty Leisure

Lofty Leisure


While many people cite the Wright Brothers’ victory at Kitty Hawk as mankind’s first successful flight, modern aviation existed long before this historic incident. The first man-made vehicle to grace the skies was the hot air balloon, taking its first flight in 1793. Invented by a French scientist, the hot air balloon’s maiden voyage was considered so precarious that its inventor refused to personally test his newfangled contraption; instead, a duck, a rooster, and a sheep. Since the hot air balloon’s skeptical beginnings, it has been employed to accomplish a wide variety of tasks. In the American Civil War, both armies utilized the hot air balloon for the purpose of espionage as the soldiers manning the aircraft could easily observe troop numbers and movements. Today, the hot air balloon is often used to advertise companies and products. It also offers scenic views to intrepid adventurers as well as thrilling opportunities to hot air balloon racers. No matter the purpose of a hot air balloon expedition, this unique experience is sure to prove uplifting to anyone brave enough to set foot in a basket.

hot air balloon magnet


The information used in this blog was pulled from https://www.brisbanehotairballooning.com.au/history-of-hot-air-balloons/. Click on this hyperlink to learn more about this fascinating hobby.

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StickerTalk Explores Christmas Around the Globe

StickerTalk Explores Christmas Around the Globe


For the StickerTalk team, Christmases are usually celebrated in typical Southeast Texas style; Christmas trees, cornbread dressing, and 80-degree weather serve as staples of the season. However, in this edition of The StickerTalk, we took the time to delve into Christmas traditions around the globe.

Egypt

Unlike their American counterparts, Christians in the African nation of Egypt celebrate Christmas on January 7. The majority of Egyptian Christians observe a strict fast in the 43 days leading up to Christmas, refraining from eating foods sourced from animals. Their fast is broken on Christmas Day during extravagant feasts and festivities. Santa Claus’s Egyptian moniker is Baba Noel, and he enters houses through windows instead of descending down the chimney. To wish an Egyptian a merry Christmas, you would say “Eid Milad Majid,” an Arabic phrase meaning “Glorious Birth Feast.”

Egyptian Flag

 

Norway

Norwegian families commonly exchange presents on Christmas Eve. While gifts may be presented by friends and family, Norwegian folklore claims that other gifts are brought by Julenissen (Santa Claus) or tiny goblins called the Nisse. Children leave rice porridge out to feed Nisse, often offering a sheaf of wheat to the birds as well. Norwegian children thoroughly enjoy the tradition of caroling. Costumed as characters from the nativity, Norwegian youngsters roam from house to house spreading the Christmas spirit amongst their friends and neighbors. Arguably Norway’s most defining Christmas tradition, the people of Norway send a gargantuan Christmas tree to the United Kingdom as a token of appreciation for the UK’s support during the Second World War. “Gledelig Jul” is the Norwegian way to say, “Merry Christmas.”

Norway Flag

Japan

While the Christian population in Japan is relatively small, Christmas still proves to be a widely celebrated holiday. As a result of Japan’s religious demographics, Japanese Christmases typically do not carry much religious significance. Some people even compare Japan’s Christmas celebration to America’s Valentine’s Day festivities as couples tend to take strolls to view Christmas light displays and enjoy romantic dinners. Strongly contrasting the American tradition of elaborate dinners, fried chicken is often served at Japanese Christmas gatherings. Japanese children know Santa Clause as santa-san; Hoteiosho, the Japanese god of good fortune, is also rumored to reward children with gifts on Christmas.

Japan Flag

 


The information used in this blog was found at whychristmas.com. Click on this URL to explore even more exotic Christmas traditions.

 

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StickerTalk’s Magnetic Attraction

StickerTalk’s Magnetic Attraction


Don’t let our name fool you; StickerTalk’s inventory offers a wide variety of carefully crafted magnets to customers in addition to our world-renouned stickers! From business signs to bumper magnets, we proudly produce magnetic versions of some of our most beloved stickers. Due to the popularity of StickerTalk magnets, we often receive questions concerning the advantages and limitations of our magnetic products. Let’s take a quick look at some of the most frequently asked questions.

  1. What surfaces will my new magnet adhere to?

Our magnets only attract ferromagnetic metals. For example, our magnets will not adhere to surfaces made of glass, wood, plastic, or aluminum.

  1. What are the advantages of purchasing a magnet?

Magnets are can be removed and repositioned more easily than our stickers. If you plan on purchasing a product that will only be used for a limited time, a magnet might be the wisest buy for you.

  1. Why are StickerTalk magnets the best on the market?

StickerTalk magnets are made to the highest standards.  All magnets begin with a creative, digital design from one of the talented members of our design team.  The new product then moves to the printer where it is professionally printed with sharp detail and vibrant color.  Your new magnet is made using only name brand materials.  We start with solvent based inks that are scratch resistant, UV resistant and waterproof.  We print that ink onto high quality vinyl and laminate it to Magnum Magnetics flexible material that is designed for vehicle use.  We have tried many different brands and product types and this is the best product available for magnets.  To make your magnet even better and to insure that it will last for years in most outdoor environments, we laminate every one with a PVC UV resistant film.  This provides extra protection against UV rays and scratches and adds more life to your magnet.  This step is one that most online sellers skip because it is time consuming and costly.  However, at StickerTalk, your satisfaction is our primary concern.  We won’t sell a magnet unless we know it is the best we can make.

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How a Crazy Cat Lady Changed History

How a Crazy Cat Lady Changed History


According to prevailing stereotypes, the crazy cat lady’s civic contributions prove extremely limited. Emerging from her cluttered abode only to procure kitty litter and canned cat food, these feline frenzied females are often viewed as a mere comic caricature of spinsterhood. However, a careful examination of American history debunks this misconception as a crazy cat lady once altered the identity of our nation. Historical records indicate that famed Civil War nurse and humanitarian Clara Barton harbored an intense love of cats. In fact, following her bravery at the Battle of Antietam, Clara received a kitten as a token of gratitude from an appreciative Union official. When she was not braving bullet-riddled battlefields or leading search, rescue, and recovery efforts, this American icon thoroughly enjoyed the company of her feline companions. Never one to be controlled by expectations and stereotypes, Clara nursed wounded soldiers, helped families locate missing loved ones following the conclusion of the American Civil War, and founded the American Red Cross, serving as its first president and essentially eliminating the social stigma attached to crazy cat ladies. The next time someone refers to you as a crazy cat lady, remember the life of this American hero and respond with a resounding “thank you!”

Purrfectly Sane Crazy Cat Lady Bumper Sticker Oval Crazy Cat Lady Sticker

Crazy Cat Lady Bumper Sticker


The historical information used in this article was pulled from http://mentalfloss.com/article/61818/8-historys-greatest-cat-ladies. Click on this URL to learn more about Clara Barton and other influential crazy cat ladies.

 

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Geocaching: A Grown-Up’s Version of Hide-and-Seek

Geocaching: A Grown-Up’s Version of Hide-and-Seek


While the great outdoors and cutting-edge technology may seem to occupy opposite ends of the spectrum, an avid geocacher can attest to the falsehood of this misconception. A hobby that combines the beauty of nature with science’s latest advancements, geocaching has developed into a wildly popular pastime. Intrepid adventurers hide durable containers in wilderness areas, hoping their humble treasures will be found by other geocachers. Because hidden geocaches prove extremely challenging to locate unassisted, geocachers rely on the amazing accuracy of global positioning systems to uncover sought-after caches. From lush forests to coastlines and from marshes to rolling plains, geocaches are concealed in an array of settings, often prompting geocaching enthusiasts to explore an assorted sampling of our world’s natural splendors. Although frequent travel may not always be an option for potential geocachers, this should not be a cause for discouragement; geocaches are often found in the most unexpected locations.

Oval We Love Geocaching Sticker

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A Celebration for All Nations

A Celebration for All Nations


Since the Biblical account of Babel, mankind has been separated by a plethora of language barriers. People from varying backgrounds commonly struggle to convey complex ideas, often discouraging interaction between cultures. While language courses and interpreters allow for some degree of understanding, flawless fluency in a foreign dialect is rarely achieved by even the most astute scholar. In spite of the difficulties imposed by conflicting verbiage, some sentiments transcend all linguistic obstacles; this phenomenon proves especially evident during the holiday season. Thoughts of peace, love, and family are prevalent in practically every nation during the festive moments leading up to Christmas Day, prompting each language to develop a unique phrase to express their feelings of goodwill. From the Spanish “Feliz Navidad” to the Hawaiian “Mele Kalikimaka,” the theme of Christmas has been adopted into countless languages. Very few and far between are individuals who possess the linguistic prowess to translate holiday well-wishes into every existing language; however, if an individual pauses long enough to listen, their heart is bound to hear a resounding “Merry Christmas” from every corner of the globe.

Feliz Navidad Sticker

Buon Natale Sticker

Mele Kalikimaka