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A Sport as American as Apple Pie

A Sport as American as Apple Pie


Few sports showcase the American spirit with the vibrancy of baseball, earning the game the title of “America’s pastime.” A relatively young sport, baseball’s origins are intricately woven into the history of the nation itself. According to some historians, facets of modern baseball are derived from a children’s game called rounders, a favorite game of early colonial athletes. The game was eventually introduced to other areas of the country. Each region adapted a unique version of the sport with certain districts constructing rather unusual game balls out of sturgeon eyes. As America transformed into an industrial superpower in the 1800s, even working men relished the lighthearted nature of the ever-changing sport, a welcome diversion from the burdens of an expanding society. While America’s assorted array of baseball players reveled in their own form of the game, standard guidelines were not penned until 1845 when a man named Alexander Joy Cartwright assembled the first set of rules for the sport. Amazingly, many of his conventions remain in place today. Cartwright’s codes were observed by soldiers on both sides of the conflict when the nation went to war against itself from 1861 to 1865. Although Union servicemen championed the sport, Northern and Southern troops alike entertained themselves with lively games of baseball in their own camps and in military prisons. During yet another of the nation’s trials, the Great Depression, baseball widely served as a means of relaxation. Since then, the sport has continued to influence American culture, sneaking into our literature and vernacular and perpetually uniting a multitude of backgrounds and beliefs under one extremely fascinating interest.

There's No Place Like Home Bumper Sticker


References:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/a-brief-history-of-the-baseball-3685086/

https://www.history.com/news/ask-history/who-invented-baseball

http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2012/08/civil-war-baseball.html

https://www.britannica.com/sports/baseball#ref782431

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The StickerTalk Explores Easter Around the World

The StickerTalk Explores Easter Around the World


One of Christianity’s most prominent celebrations, Easter is heralded by a number of various traditions and celebrations. While Passion plays, chocolate bunnies, and egg hunts are common sights here in Southeast Texas, other cultures commemorate Christ’s resurrection in more exotic manners. In this edition of The StickerTalk, we invite you to embark on an expedition to observe Easter around the globe.

 

Burkina Faso

This African nation is defined by abounding religious diversity among its citizens, a statistic that prompts Christians in Burkina Faso share Easter celebrations with their non-Christian neighbors, many of whom are Muslim. Like American believers, Burkina Faso’s assorted array of celebrators attend church and enjoy hearty meals. The people of Burkina Faso also make social calls on Easter, visiting friends and family members who are not seen very frequently.

Spain

A nation immersed in the Catholic faith, Spain requires an entire week for their extravagant Easter celebrations. Named Semana Santa, or Holy Week, this extended holiday involves Spanish Christians participating in candlelit vigils, grandiose parades, and solemn reflection. Spain’s religious processions, though earnest in nature, attract countless curious wanderers to witness larger-than-life depictions of Biblical scenes, rigid military expositions, and a variety of other cultural marvels.

The Philippines

Christians in the Philippine Islands boast perhaps the most extreme Easter tradition on Earth. In order to remember the sacrifice of Calvary and to petition divine intervention, a handful of brave Filipino Christians are, in essence, “crucified.” Often after subjecting themselves to whippings and beatings, they are nailed to wooden crosses with real nails. The participants survive the ordeal, unlike an authentic crucifixion, but always require immediate medical attention following the reenactments.

Happy Easter Bumper Sticker


References:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/14/crucifixion-jesus-christ-re-enacted-philippines/

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2017/04/14/filipinos-re-enact-christs-crucifixion-in-gory-good-friday-ritual.html

https://publicholidays.africa/burkina-faso/easter/

https://spainattractions.es/easter-spain/

 

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Marvelous Memphis

Marvelous Memphis


Named after an ancient Egyptian city, Memphis, Tennessee, serves as a hub of art and culture. Its rich history teamed with the surrounding natural scenery have earned the city the world’s fascination. While reasons to visit Memphis abound in multitudes, The StickerTalk has compiled a list of our favorite aspects of this unique destination.

    • Memphis was once home to “royalty.” After rising from extreme poverty to unfathomable fame, Elvis Presley made his home in this Tennessean city. His adoring fans continue to flock to his mansion in Memphis to pay homage to the King of Rock and Roll.
    • Like barbecue? You’ll love Memphis! An excess of 100 barbecue restaurants are contained within Memphis’s city limits, giving diners an opportunity to sample authentic southern fare.
    • Memphis boasts musical roots. While its sister city, Nashville, plays host to countless country music performers and venues, Memphis is famous for blues and rock and roll. No trip to Memphis would be complete without pausing to listen to these iconic genres in their native home!

Oval Tennessee Flag Memphis Sticker


References:

http://www.memphistravel.com/travel-professionals/tips-guided-tours

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The StickerTalk Explores St. Patrick’s Day

The StickerTalk Explores St. Patrick’s Day


A day dedicated to Ireland’s vibrant culture, it comes as no surprise that St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated by a wide variety of other nations. While most people are moderately familiar with the holiday’s quirky traditions, St. Patrick’s Day customs are deeply rooted in Irish religion and convention. In this biweekly addition of The StickerTalk, we have sifted through the yellowed pages of history to present a concise examination of the traditions and beliefs behind St. Patrick’s Day.

  • Why do we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day?

As its name implies, this holiday honors St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. St. Patrick is credited with popularizing    Christianity in Ireland, essentially abolishing the pagan lifestyle of the native Irish people.

  • Why do people wear green on St. Patrick’s Day?

Oddly, blue was the first color to be associated with St. Patrick. However, as the saint became an easily recognizable symbol of the Emerald Isle, green soon became the “official” color of the holiday. St. Patrick’s use of the shamrock to explain the Trinity may have also contributed to the use of green to represent this celebration.

  • What foods are traditionally eaten on St. Patrick’s Day?

Corned beef and cabbage typically appear on reveler’s plates on St. Patrick’s Day. Irish bacon was originally consumed on this holiday, but impoverished Irish immigrants found corned beef to be an affordable and tasty substitute.

Happy St. Patrick's Day Bumper Sticker
Happy St. Patrick’s Day Bumper Sticker

References:

https://www.history.com/topics/st-patricks-day/st-patricks-day-symbols-and-traditions

https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2010/0317/St.-Patrick-s-Day-Why-do-we-wear-green

http://www.ireland-information.com/saintpatricksdaytraditions.htm

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Carefree Kayaking

Carefree Kayaking


For centuries, mankind has been drawn to the water for peace and serenity. While hobbies like swimming and fishing have seemingly existed since time began, a relatively new water activity entices a growing population of participants to abandon their worries and pick up a paddle. The popular sport of kayaking appeals to a large audience by offering opportunities for quiet reflection, pristine glimpses of the natural world, and a moderate amount of physical exercise. Although this hobby currently transcends cultures and generations, kayaking was cultivated from humble origins. Kayaks first appeared in the icy waters of the Arctic as the Aleut and Inuit peoples invented the lightweight craft for hunting. In fact, the word kayak means “hunter’s boat.” These tribes also utilized the kayak for travel and trade. Through cultural expansion and discovery, European sportsmen discovered the kayak in the Nineteenth century. These Europeans are often credited with transforming the practical use of the kayak into a sporting event. In fact, kayaking became so popular that it found its way into the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, Germany. With sustained interest from people of all backgrounds, the kayak continues glide across lakes, rivers, and oceans, a symbol of both tradition and innovation.

Kayaker on Board Sticker


References:

http://www.thearticulatetrainer.com/examples/Moving-Timeline/story_content/external_files/The%20History%20of%20the%20Kayak.pdf

https://adventure.howstuffworks.com/outdoor-activities/water-sports/kayaking4.htm

eddyline.com

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A Weekend to Remember

A Weekend to Remember


Although we typically market our world-renowned products online, the StickerTalk crew challenged this norm by manning a booth at our hometown’s annual Redbud Festival this weekend. A new experience for our team, our booth was open for two days at the Buna, Texas, fairgrounds. During this period, we were able to share our carefully crafted stickers with our friends and neighbors and receive a plethora of ideas for new products when we were not sampling funnel cakes and other carnival staples. This experience, although slightly unusual for our web-based company, proved to be an absolute pleasure. We would like to thank everyone who visited our booth for your support; the StickerTalk team cannot express how much our community’s patronage means to us! If you missed this unique opportunity to purchase our products, there is no need to worry. With the sustained support of customers like you, StickerTalk will continue to sell our quality-made stickers and magnets online for years to come!

                  Part of the StickerTalk team poses in front of our booth.
Our awe-inducing StickerTruck also made an appearance at the StickerTalk              booth.

 

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Coming Soon to a Festival Near You!

Coming Soon to a Festival Near You!


StickerTalk is excited to announce that a sampling of our vast inventory will be available for purchase at our hometown’s 46th annual Redbud Festival! From inspirational crosses to local mascots, our booth will house over 50 of our best sellers. In addition to our classic line of stickers, StickerTalk is also proud to produce commemorative Buna Redbud Festival stickers. Come see us at the fairgrounds on Friday, March 9 or Saturday, March 10! We will be happy to visit and share our craftsmanship with you!

Die Cut Texas Buna Redbud Sticker

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The StickerTalk Celebrates Texas Independence Day

The StickerTalk Celebrates Texas Independence Day


The year is 1836. General Antonio Lopez de Santa Ana’s iron-fisted rule of Texas has finally reached a fever pitch as the Mexican dictator and his army lay siege to the Alamo mission near San Antonio, preventing its Texian defenders from receiving vital supplies or military support. To the dismay of the region’s settlers, Santa Ana has previously committed a plethora of atrocities against the fledgling nation. By rewriting the Mexican Constitution, the power hungry politician and military leader declared himself supreme leader, the Texas territory a slave to his unlimited power. Texian rebels began fighting for their freedom from Mexico in October of 1835, but it was not until March 2, 1836, that independence was officially declared. While the declaration functioned as a morale booster among rebel troops and sympathizers, this bold proclamation enraged the Mexican government. As a result, Santa Ana mercilessly destroyed the band of patriots defending the Alamo and later oversaw the even deadlier Goliad Massacre. The Texian’s spirit still unbroken, General Sam Houston and his troops managed to defeat the invading Mexican army at San Jacinto in less than an hour, at last procuring independence for the oppressed territory. Today, Texans from all corners of the vast state continue to celebrate March 2 as Texas Independence Day, uniting under the common causes of freedom and equality for everyone who has ever had the privilege to call Texas their home.

 

Texas State Flag


References:

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Texas-Revolution

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/texas-declares-independence