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The StickerTalk Celebrates International Jazz Day

The StickerTalk Celebrates International Jazz Day


On April 30 musicians around the world will celebrate International Jazz Day. A truly unequalled musical genre, jazz invites listeners of all backgrounds to immerse themselves in its rich harmonies and unusual rhythms. Jazz’s unique flair can be traced to the style’s origins. The genre was born when slaves from West Africa were transported to the Southern United States. These captives preserved their tribal heritage by fusing traditional African musical elements with those of conventional European compositions. This collision of worlds not only spawned new modes of musicality but also inspired the assembly of unprecedented ensembles; African instruments like the banjo and guitar accompanied European instruments including the saxophone, piano, and trumpet. Jazz music reached prominence in the early 1900s. Musicians like Louis Armstrong and his cohorts helped popularize the style. While every jazz musician displayed uncanny artistic prowess, jazz’s emphasis on individuality and improvisation ensured that each artist developed a distinct identity. The genre’s ability to provide voice and singularity continue to grant jazz a permanent place in the heart of people around the globe, a musical style worthy of celebration!

Die Cut Trumpet Bumper Sticker


References:

https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/un/jazz-day

https://www.britannica.com/art/jazz

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Wilson’s Creek: Home of Unsung Heroes

Wilson’s Creek: Home of Unsung Heroes


When asked to recall information concerning the battles comprising the American Civil War, most people paint sprawling images of the chaos at Gettysburg or the destruction following Sherman’s March to the Sea. However, one of the most important battles of the war was fought west of the Mississippi. Often called the Bull Run of the West, the Battle of Wilson’s Creek took place in the rolling hills of Missouri on August 10, 1861. Historians cite the St. Louis Massacre as the source of this conflict; in May of 1861, Union officer Nathaniel Lyon caused a riot in St. Louis when he paraded a group of pro-secessionist prisoners through the city’s streets. This unintended carnage in St. Louis turned many Missourians against Lyon and his Federal forces. The opposing sides finally met near Wilson’s Creek in the cornfield of John and Roxanna Ray. To the family’s horror, the Ray house was transformed into a hospital after the fighting began, but not before their property sustained a fair amount of damage, forcing most of the family into the safety of their cellar. While the house itself was not hit by any artillery, the Rays’ chicken coop was counted among the many casualties of the battle. At the conclusion of the battle, over two thousand soldiers had laid down their lives including General Lyon, the first Union general to be claimed by the American Civil War. Although the Battle of Wilson’s Creek is not counted among the most renowned conflicts of the war, many historians agree that the battle played an integral role in the North’s ultimate victory, helping solidify the preservation of the Union and aiding in the abolition of slavery.

Oval Wilson's Creek Sticker


References:

https://www.nps.gov/wicr/learn/historyculture/the-ray-house.htm

http://www.civilwaronthewesternborder.org/encyclopedia/battle-wilson’s-creek

http://wilsonscreek.com/history

https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/battle-of-wilsons-creek

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Bodacious Bowling

Bodacious Bowling


The sport of bowling, both engrossing and exacting in nature, boast a lengthy role in culture and entertainment. According to an archeological discovery made during the 1930s, Ancient Egyptians may have been the first bowlers. The sport then spread to Europe. Early Germans allegedly proved natural bowlers as did the English; in fact, British soldiers so frequently engaged in bowling that King Edward III forbade his military from the sport in order to keep their minds on military matters. American colonists developed serval versions of the game upon their arrival to the New World. When bowling formed a strong association with gambling and other misdemeanors, Connecticut’s legislators outlawed bowling. However, in spite of government disapproval, the sport never lost popularity among American aristocrats, many of whom constructed bowling lanes in their homes. In the 1800s modern bowling was spawned following the formation of the American Bowling Congress. Since its establishment, the Congress has overseen the perpetual advancement of the sport, ensuring bowlers of all generations have the opportunity to enjoy this unique sport.

Bowling Ball bumper sticker


References:

http://www.bowlingmuseum.com/Visit/Education/History-of-Bowling

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The Bonnie, Bonnie Banks of Loch… Ness

The Bonnie, Bonnie Banks of Loch… Ness


Characterized by intrigue and enigma, Loch Ness is among the most popular tourist destinations in the world. This pristine lake located in the Scottish Highlands effortlessly captures the attention of a multitude of curious explorers, many of whom hope to catch a glimpse of the ever-elusive Loch Ness Monster. In this edition of The StickerTalk, we have compiled a collection of arcane, obscure, and amazing facts concerning this global focal point of wanderers from all walks of life.

  • A direct result of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, a layer of radioactive settlement has been sitting at the bottom of Loch Ness since 1986.
  • The deepest part of the lake is about 812 feet deep, making Loch Ness the second-deepest lake in Scotland.
  • Dr. Robert Rines, an explorer partially responsible for discovering the Titanic, ventured to Loch Ness where he dedicated over 30 years of his life to finding the Loch Ness monster.
  • An average of 20 Loch Ness monster sightings are reported each year.
  • The first Loch Ness Monster sighting occurred in the 800s; sightings continue to serve as a source of both excitement and speculation.

Oval Scottish Flag Loch Ness Sticker


Sources:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/united-kingdom/scotland/articles/Loch-Ness-Monster-50-fascinating-facts/

https://www.britannica.com/place/Loch-Ness-lake-Scotland-United-Kingdom

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/science-obituaries/6502999/Robert-Rines.html

There is a radioactive sediment layer from Chernobyl in Loch Ness

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Chocolate: A Timeless Temptation

Chocolate: A Timeless Temptation


Chocolate is one sweet treat that universally serves as a guilty pleasure. Although most people prefer to enjoy its sweet, rich flavor in candy bars, cakes, and other food items, chocolate made is culinary debut in liquid form. The Olmecs, Mayans, and Aztecs devoutly consumed chocolate as a spiced beverage. One of the most prominent chocoholics of his time, Aztec emperor Montezuma II supposedly drank gallons of liquid chocolate every day; his subjects even used cacao beans as currency. When European explorers collided with these chocolate-loving tribes, the conquistadors were intrigued by the unique taste of this culinary staple. Upon their return to Europe, they spread the appetite for chocolate among curious residents of the Old World. The European love of chocolate proved evident in the colonization of America as settlers of all classes eagerly consumed their own versions of the ancient drink. In fact, colonial soldiers involved in the American Revolution were occasionally paid in chocolate instead of money. It wasn’t until 1847 that the chocolate bar was created and popularized. Today, people of all cultures continue to savor chocolate in many shapes, states, and forms as the chocolate industry perpetually expands. Before you bite into your favorite candy bar, pause to appreciate the dessert’s sweet heritage!

Chocolate Cake Sticker


Sources:

https://www.history.com/topics/history-of-chocolate

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The StickerTalk Celebrates National Sibling Day

The StickerTalk Celebrates National Sibling Day


April 10 marks the annual observance of National Sibling Day. A holiday commonly celebrated on an assorted array of social media platforms, the holiday prompts revelers to snap a selfie with brothers and sisters, reflect on treasured memories, and laud their siblings’ unique quirks. While each household cultivates differing dynamics, science indicates the existence of  universal relationships between siblings. In this edition of The StickerTalk, we have hand-picked a few of our favorites to share in honor of National Sibling Day.

  • People with siblings often showcase superior interpersonal skills. As anyone with a brother or sister may attest, maintaining sibling relationships typically requires a fair amount of diplomacy, ingenuity, and charisma.
  • Younger siblings tend to flaunt more extroverted personalities. In some cases, younger brothers and sisters may even develop rebellious tendencies as a result of their birth order.
  • Siblings commonly share bad habits. Science has repeatedly proven the importance of siblings’ influence, so it comes as no surprise that a sibling may introduce damaging behaviors to brothers and sisters.
  • Siblings rarely share similar personality traits. Contrasting behaviors may be caused by a sibling’s efforts to establish individuality.
  • Having siblings may help you keep your weight under control. One study claims that this is especially true between sisters.

brother

number one sister sticker


Resources:

https://www.scoopwhoop.com/Science-Has-To-Say-About-Siblings/#.jh9tud2ek

https://www.whattoexpect.com/family/sibling-relationships-facts

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‘Cross the Wide Missouri

‘Cross the Wide Missouri


An area forever immortalized in song, the land comprising Shenandoah National Park is steeped in history and rich in natural beauty. The region’s first settlers were Native Americans who thrived from the land’s abundant natural resources. Shenandoah’s picturesque landscapes amazed European adventurers when they arrived in the eighteenth century. Many of these newcomers earned a living as fur trappers and traders, naturally flooding to the flourishing ecosystems of the Shenandoah Valley. Eventually, homesteads speckled the formerly remote hills of the area as courageous pioneers ventured westward. Present-day Shenandoah National Park witnessed its fair share of combat during the American Civil War; both the Northern and Southern militaries aimed to gain control of the area, leading to periodic skirmishes. The valley again made history during the Great Depression. In response to alarming unemployment rates, the political minds behind the New Deal established the Civilian Conservation Corps. The CCC, in its quest to provide jobs to young men, transformed Shenandoah Valley into the national park modern tourists know and love. Offering opportunities for hiking, camping, and quiet reflection, Shenandoah National Park is truly one of America’s hidden gems.

Green Oval SNP Shenandoah National Park Sticker


Sources:

https://www.nps.gov/shen/learn/historyculture/index.htm

http://www.balladofamerica.com/music/indexes/songs/shenandoah/index.htm

https://www.history.com/topics/civilian-conservation-corps

https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/shenandoah-valley-campaigns

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The Divine Dalmatian

The Divine Dalmatian


A breed famous for their spotted coat, the Dalmatian dog breed proves a household favorite across the globe. Although many automatically imagine the speckled dog perched atop an old-fashioned fire wagon, the Dalmatian boasts a rather diverse, yet arcane, history. Historians cannot determine the exact origin of the breed but believe the dog earned its name while living in Dalmatia with bands of roaming gypsies. In Dalmatia, the breed enjoyed a variety of tasks. From assisting shepherds to amusing audiences in lighthearted circus performances, the Dalmatian’s complex personality allowed it to accomplish an assorted array of endeavors. The Dalmatian’s keen sense of intelligence and athletic prowess additionally impressed the English who utilized the breed as a coach dog, a job that involved protecting the carriage and horses as well as clearing the coach’s path along crowded city streets. When the Dalmatian crossed the Atlantic  and arrived in America, it was given its most well-known title: firefighter. Firehouse Dalmatians continued their work as coach dogs, running alongside fire wagons. However, the breed took a more active role in search and rescue missions. Several reports exist of Dalmatians braving fiery embers to lead disoriented or incapacitated victims to safety. Today, while the population of firehouse Dalmatians has somewhat diminished, the breed still serves as a beloved pet. Their comical personality coupled with a heart of gold secure the Dalmatian a sacred spot in the hearts of dog lovers everywhere.

I Love My Dalmatian Bumper Sticker


References:

http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/dalmatian#/slide/9

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Flowering Hope

Flowering Hope


Brightly dyed eggs and cheerful bunnies commonly constitute symbols of Easter, but one religious motif captures the spirit of the holiday like no other. The lily has served an integral role in Easter celebrations of countless generations, appearing in both churches and devout Christian households during the Easter season. A deeply symbolic representation, the lily boasts a multifaceted interpretation of Christ’s triumph over the grave. In this edition of The StickerTalk, we invite you to take a closer look at the many illustrations of the Easter message portrayed through the lily.

  • The lily’s white petals convey the purity and innocence of Jesus Christ, while the golden hue of the flower’s stamen proclaim His majesty.
  • The bell-like shape of the lily is reminiscent of the Archangel Gabriel’s trumpet. In the Bible, Gabriel heralded Jesus’ birth to a multitude of believers. Additionally, Christians believe that the sound of Gabriel’s trumpet will announce His return.
  • Finally, the lily’s growth patterns parallel the Easter story. Planted as a bulb, the lily suddenly springs to life as a beautiful blossom; for many Christians, this symbolizes Christ’s resurrection.

 

 

Lily Sticker


References:

http://www.goupstate.com/news/20090412/symbol-of-rebirth-easter-lilies-are-timed-tradition

http://www.eastergoodfriday.com/symbols-of-easter.html