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Amazing Alaska

Amazing Alaska


Stretching across the northern wilderness, the state of Alaska proves a modern marvel of civilization. From snow-capped mountain peaks to famous dog sled races, the Last Frontier offers a variety of wonders to travelers of all ages and backgrounds. In this biweekly edition of The StickerTalk, we hope to highlight a handful of Alaska’s high points, paying homage to a state with deep-seated roots in the past and brilliant dreams for the future.

Everything’s Bigger in… Alaska? It’s no small secret that Alaska is the largest American state; it snatched the title from Texas upon its annexation in 1959. However, it may come as a surprise that Alaska is home to four of the largest cities in the United States, the largest of these metropolitan monsters being Sitka. Sitka, claiming no more than 11,000 residents, sprawls over 2,870.3 square miles, making the city larger than the state of Rhode Island!

An Arctic Paradise While Sitka can rightfully boast of its sheer size, the city of Anchorage, Alaska, proves a treasure trove of surprises. Anchorage serves as a safe haven for people suffering from ophidiophobia as the city’s snake population is comprised only of domesticated pets; in fact, no species of snakes are native to the entire state of Alaska. Additionally, Anchorage offers the most espresso stands per capita in the United States and is free from any form of sales tax.

The Last Great Race on Earth One of Alaska’s most iconic events is the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. This harrowing challenge annually honors the courage and sacrifice of the mushers and sled dogs of a bygone era. In January of 1925 the village of Nome, Alaska, fell victim to a lethal outbreak of diphtheria. The icy weather froze Nome’s ports and grounded airplanes, so sled teams were largely responsible for delivering a valuable shipment of medicine to a dying community. Participants in today’s Iditarod race begin their trek in Anchorage and cross the finish line in Nome after traversing an approximate distance of 1,000 miles.

Oval AK Alaska Flag Sticker


Sources:

http://www.travelingwiththejones.com/2015/03/25/28-fun-facts-about-anchorage-alaska/

https://www.history.com/news/the-sled-dog-relay-that-inspired-the-iditarod

http://theweek.com/articles/449492/11-amazing-facts-about-iditarod

https://www.ri.gov/facts/trivia.php

https://www.britannica.com/event/Alaska-Purchase

https://factualfacts.com/us-largest-cities/

https://www.alaskatourjobs.com/blog/working-in-alaska/top-10-facts-about-anchorage-you-need-to-know-as-a-tour-guide/

 

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Aiming High

Aiming High


A sport dating back to the pinnacle of ancient Egypt, archery requires both physical strength and careful cunning. Because each generation has adopted its own variation of the sport, archery boasts a rich heritage steeped in a plethora of cultures and customs. In this edition of The StickerTalk, we have amassed an assorted array of archery actualities in order to share the sport’s timeless history.

Archery… Or Else! King Edward IV, fearing the up-and-coming sport of cricket would hinder his subjects’ archery practice, banned the new game. Later, when English athletes began developing the game of football (or soccer), King Henry VIII again discouraged participation in archery’s rival sports. King Henry VIII later legally mandated weekly archery practices for his subjects and ordered English fathers to pass the love and knowledge of archery to their sons.

By Any Other Name Another name for an archer is a toxophilite. Although this synonym is scarcely utilized, this Greek-inspired word translates to “lover of the bow.”

The Sport of Heroes Homer’s epic, the Odyssey, relates the story of Odysseus, a powerful king separated from his kingdom and family for two decades. Upon his eventual return to his homeland, Odysseus showcases his archery skills to confirm his identity to his skeptical wife and overthrow his remaining enemies.

Archer On Board Sticker


Sources:

http://www.scortonarrow.com/features/archery_its%20the%20law.htm

https://worldarchery.org/news/93847/brief-history-archery

https://www.forestersfriendlysociety.co.uk/latest-news/foresters-blog/10-fascinating-facts-about-archery/

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Westward Bound!

Westward Bound!


In spite of its sleek, futuristic design, the Gateway Arch traces its roots back to the early days of American exploration. This magnificent monument’s origins begin with the Louisiana Purchase of 1803; President Thomas Jefferson, driven by the dream of national expansion, acquired over 800,000,000 square miles of formerly French land for the rather reasonable sum of fifteen million dollars. Jefferson, eager to delve into the enigmas of the American frontier, ordained an exploration into his newly obtained territory headed by Meriweather Lewis and William Clark. Jefferson’s presidency may have ended long ago, but his passion for expansion lives on. Designed by Eero Saarenin and completed in 1965, the Gateway Arch comprises a portion of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St. Louis, Missouri. The Arch, a truly incredible undertaking, required thirteen million dollars to construct, a figure equaling $130 million in today’s currency. Combining America’s rich history with a host of inventive innovations, the Gateway Arch is a technological marvel as well as a cultural Mecca. This unique tribute holds a plethora of records including the world’s tallest arch, the world’s tallest stainless steel monument, and the tallest man-made monument in the Western Hemisphere. The monument is also designed to withstand earthquakes and violent winds. However, perhaps the Gateway Arch’s greatest achievement is its ability to transcend the ages, uniting all Americans under a common bond of curiosity and discovery.

Gateway National Park Sticker
Gateway National Park Sticker

 


Sources:

http://www.softschools.com/facts/us_geography/gateway_arch_facts/2394/

http://justfunfacts.com/interesting-facts-about-the-gateway-arch/

https://www.history.com/topics/louisiana-purchase

https://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/louisiana.html

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Dynamic Dads

Dynamic Dads


Each year, the third Sunday in June is reserved for the celebration of Father’s Day. A holiday honoring the traditional protector and provider for the household, Father’s Day has been celebrated since the early 1900s. The fatherly festival owes much of its existence to Sonora Smart Dodd, the “Mother of Father’s Day.” Inspired by her own father, a Civil War veteran who raised six children following the death of his wife, Dodd’s desire to honor her father’s leadership and guidance transformed the social landscape of America. Father’s Day was casually observed by millions until it received the title of national holiday in 1972 when President Nixon signed it into law. Although family dynamics continue to shift, the holiday has remained unwaveringly popular. According to recent data, Father’s Day boasts the largest quantity of collect phone calls and proves the fourth-largest season for greeting cards with over 87 million Father’s Day cards annually purchased.

While most Americans celebrate Father’s Day according to Dodd’s original calendar scheme, other cultures have alternative dates set aside for the celebration of their fathers. For example, many predominantly Catholic nations honor their fathers on March 19, St. Joseph’s Day. This combination of celebrations allows observers to esteem St. Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus, and their own fathers simultaneously.

Father’s Day has only a handful of official traditions, but a few trends have become evident throughout the years. One such informal custom is the presentation of gifts to fathers, namely the giving of neckties. Research has shown that the humble necktie has been the most popular Father’s Day gift since the creation of the holiday.

Each country, culture, and family may celebrate a unique variation of Father’s Day; however, the unconditional love of a father remains the same across the globe.

Oval I Love My Dad Sticker


Sources:

http://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/2018/06/16/father-s-day-5-little-known-facts-about-holiday.html

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/smart-living/15-fun-fathers-day-facts/ss-AAh99OE#image=1

https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/us/fathers-day

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The Marvelous Mastiff

The Marvelous Mastiff


A dog characterized by its oxymoronic combination of sheer mass and gentle demeanor, the Mastiff is often considered one of the oldest breeds in existence. Although modern Mastiffs often prove leisure-loving giants, the breed’s colorful past contains stories of valor, vengeance, and suspense. In this edition of The StickerTalk, we have mustered a handful of the highlights of the Mastiff’s vibrant history.

An Ancient Warrior The molossus, a predecessor of the present-day Mastiff, was bred for the purposes of hunting and combat. The molossus and other mastiff ancestors hunted lions in ancient Babylon, fought wild animals in Roman arenas, and charged into battle alongside Carthaginian and Celtic soldiers.

Famous Cousins Because the Mastiff stands head and shoulders above the majority of other breeds, it may be difficult to believe that other dogs share their lineage with the canine behemoth. Some of the Mastiff’s cousins include the Chow Chow and, surprisingly, the pug!

Protector, Patron… Pilgrim? Although the evidence is not conclusive, many reports claim that a Mastiff accompanied the pilgrims aboard the Mayflower across the Atlantic and into the New World.

I Love My Mastiff Bumper Sticker


Sources:

http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/mastiff#/slide/1

http://www.mcoamastiff.com/MASTIFFHISTORY.htm

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The StickerTalk Celebrates National Aquarium Month

The StickerTalk Celebrates National Aquarium Month


Fittingly, the month of June serves as National Aquarium Month. As the weather warms and beachgoers flock to the shorelines, conservationists hope this month-long celebration will inspire intrigue in curious minds concerning the native inhabitants of our beloved oceans. A timeless tradition, aquariums trace their extensive roots to ancient times. Ancient Egyptians may have been the first of many aquarium owners, retaining schools of fish in holding ponds for later utilization. Other archaic civilizations, including the Assyrians, the Chinese, and the Japanese, proved successful aquarium custodians. However, it was not until the year 1832 that Jeanne Villepreux-Power created the first glass aquarium. Later, in 1852, the first public display aquarium opened in London, England. An assorted array of aquatic specimens may be observed in modern aquariums; from the deceptively deadly stonefish to marine marvels like the dumbo octopus, aquariums showcase the diversity contained in our oceans. This June, experience the splendor of creation flourishing beneath the waves by visiting your local aquarium!

Magenta Fish Heart Sticker


Sources:

http://www.dailycal.org/2015/06/15/celebrate-national-aquarium-month/

https://www.csmonitor.com/Photo-Galleries/In-Pictures/The-20-weirdest-fish-in-the-ocean#254071

https://www.sportdiver.com/17-most-bizarre-creatures-in-ocean#page-3

https://www.britannica.com/science/aquarium

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A Dessert of Dizzying Description

A Dessert of Dizzying Description


The humble donut, sweet, soft, and sugary, globally serves as a breakfast staple. From donuts adorned with vibrant sprinkles to the modest glazed dessert devoured by donut purists, there is a flavor for every palate. While most people have savored the  tempting taste of this popular pastry, few donut-devourers are aware of the donut’s rich history. In this biweekly edition of The StickerTalk, we have amassed the essential ingredients of the pastry’s past, a treat we hope you will enjoy!

  • By Any Other Name… The donut, due to its international presence, has accumulated a variety of monikers. One of its earliest names, “olykoek,” was a Dutch term meaning “oily cake.” In present-day America, however, both “doughnut” and “donut” are common variations denoting the fried fancy.
  • A Taste of Home In both World Wars donuts were offered to lonely soldiers in attempt to diminish their heartache. In World War I, female volunteers affectionally named “Doughnut Girls” distributed the dessert while Red Cross volunteers, more colloquially called “Doughnut Dollies” served the snack in World War II.
  • A Blissful Blunder Some sources claim that the donut was invented by a cow! According to the tale, the oblivious bovine kicked a pot of boiling oil onto some pastry batter, frying up the world’s first, but certainly not last, batch of donuts.

I Love Donuts Bumper Sticker


Sources:

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/05/donut-facts_n_4214060.html

https://www.thechildrenstrust.org.uk/top-10-fascinating-facts-about-doughnuts